Ten Lost Non-League Grounds

The sheer amount of non-league grounds that have disappeared in the last three decades is staggering. Here I pause to remember just a handful of them.

ROSSENDALE UNITED

GROUND: Dark Lane, Staghills Road, Newchurch, Waterfoot, Lancashire

RECORD ATTENDANCE: 3,450 v Shrewsbury Town (FA Cup) 22/11/1975

Rossendale United were formed in 1898 after the demise of the areas two previously dominant sides Rawtenstall and Myrtle Grove, the latter having made an audacious attempt at Football League membership as Rossendale FC in 1894. The newly formed club took over at the Dark Lane ground that had previously been used for Rugby Union. The magnificent main stand was opened in August 1928 but by the late 1970’s it was decidedly worse for wear. However, extensive renovation and a smart blue and white paint job had seen the old stand returned to its former glory. The Dark Lane ground was first lit up with floodlights in 1959 although the present set date from 1972. The new set of pylons were funded by the clubs tremendous run in the 1971 FA Cup when they were finally defeated by Bolton Wanderers in the Second Round in front of a 12,000 crowd in a match staged at Bury’s Gigg Lane ground. An important event happened in 1982 when the club secured a long term future when a 99 year lease was agreed with the grounds owners. The clubs promotion to the Northern Premier League in 1989 saw further ground improvements. The club hit hard times and were relegated back to the North West Counties League and towards the end of the 2010/11 season the board resigned en masse and the owner of the ground had decided to foreclose having failed to find a buyer for the site. In June 2011 a new committee had decided to form a new club, Rossendale FC, and apply to rejoin senior football using the Dark Lane ground. However, this venture was abruptly ended when a calamitous fire engulfed an already badly vandalised ground.

Rossendale United 007

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STANLEY UNITED

GROUND: Hill Top Ground, High Road, Stanley, County Durham

RECORD ATTENDANCE: 5,000 v Leytonstone (FA Amateur Cup) 1920

The home of Stanley United has been nicknamed the Hill Top ground, which is something of an understatement as a drive to the ground involved a climb through the Stockley Fells to the small mining village of Stanley that sits high above the Durham town of Crook. The two sides were bitter rivals in the 1930’s and, indeed, Stanley lost their Northern League place to Crook in 1936. However, the club were re-elected to that prestigious competition in 1945. They remained in the Northern League until the end of the 1973/74 season when they resigned due to a lack of volunteers to run the club. They dropped down to the Durham City and District League before moving to the Wearside League. The High Road ground had been home since the end of World War I and was a remarkably atmospheric ground. On the far side was a large covered stand which provided very welcome refuge from biting winds. The grounds most well-known feature of the ground was on the opposite side where, within the ground itself, was an old two up, two down house. This provided changing facilities and upstairs were the tea bar which had amazingly wonky floorboards. The club last competed in the Wearside League in the 2002/03 season and after a few seasons in local football called it a day, citing a lack of support. The stand and house were swiftly demolished and all that remains of this much loved venue is a few twisted pitch railings.

Stanley United 1996

Stanley United 1996 (1)

COCKFIELD

GROUND: Hazel Grove, Coalfield, County Durham

A renowned village club who made their own little piece of history when, in 1928, they reached the final of the FA Amateur Cup. They had and excellent record in that competition throughout their glory days of the 1920’s, but without doubt reaching the final was a crowning achievement that made national headlines of a tiny Durham mining village. Sadly, as so often happens, the opposition in the final, Leyton did not follow the script and triumphed 3-2 in the final in front of 12,200 spectators at Ayresome Park. The club played in several local leagues before gaining election to the prestigious Northern League in 1921. The club remained in that League until the competition ceased in for World War II. The club later fell on hard times, especially when the colliery closed, and eventually disbanded for many years, until a revival came about in 1985. The Hazel Grove ground has been home throughout most of their history and when I visited the ground, even though I was alone for some time before players arrived, you could sense the history and atmosphere of this classic ground. The rough hewn timber stand and its more modern tin cover opposite provide much needed shelter from the elements. The ground positively ached for a large gathering, you could almost hear the ghosts of yesterday watching those great old Amateur Cup matches and earthy yells of ‘Play up Cockfield.’ After some good years in the Durham Alliance the club dropped down to the Crook & District League and the Hazel Grove ground was heading towards dereliction not helped by the attentions of local vandals. The club sadly folded in 2010 after an approach to the local parish council for funding for repairs to the dressing rooms was rejected.

Cockfield 1996 (1)

Cockfield 1996

EDGWARE TOWN

GROUND: White Lion Ground, High Street, Edgware, Middlesex

RECORD ATTENDANCE: 8,500 v Wealdstone (FA Cup) 29/10/1949

The newly formed Edgware F.C. acquired the use of the field behind the White Lion Public House in 1939 and after the war the grandstand was opened and steep banking created around the ground. The covered terrace was erected a few years later. By the late 1970’s the White Lion Ground had long since seen its better days and was crumbling badly. The lack of care eventually resulted in the old grandstand being totally destroyed by a fire in 1982. The club benefited from the insurance payout which provided a new stand of almost identical size . A groundshare with long time rivals Wealdstone, which had started in 1995, had seen the ground gentrified further. Edgware had been relegated from the Isthmian League at the end of the 2004/05 season but had won the Spartan South Midlands League treble in their first season in that competition. Returning to the Isthmian League the future looked bright until Wealdstone’s owner acquired a majority shareholding in Ruislip Manor F.C. and announced his intention to redevelop that club’s Grosvenor Vale ground. By the end of the 2007/08 season Edgware simply ran out of funds and folded. The ground still remains, the main stand is a pile of rubble and the turnstile blocks are part demolished. The cover on the far side remains but has been overtaken by nature.

Edgware TFC

Picture 008

ENFIELD

GROUND: Southbury Road, Enfield, Middlesex

RECORD ATTENDANCE: 10,000 v Tottenham Hotspur 10/10/1962

Much was been written about the demise of Enfield’s much loved Southbury Road ground. The problems really started when Saracens RUFC moved from Southgate to share at Enfield’s ground. The large covered terrace opposite the main stand was demolished and had temporary open seating erected. However, when Saracens swiftly departed for Watford, the side was tarmaced over with no terrace or cover. The asset stripping of the club continued unabaited in the late 1990’s and the ground was lost to developers in 1999 and bulldozed with indecent haste. Various relocation plans were mooted at the Tesco Country Club in Cheshunt or Brimsdown Rovers ground at Goldsdown Road. Empty promises then saw this once well supported club playing in crowds of under 100, miles away at Boreham Wood’s Meadow Park ground. Now known as Enfield 1893 they now play in the Essex Senior League using the Goldsdown Road ground. In 2001 some disgruntled and heartbroken officials and supporters formed their own club, Enfield Town, who have latterly returned to the Borough occupying the Queen Elizabeth II Stadium in Donkey Lane, replete with it’s listed status Art Deco cafeteria.

Enfield

enfield SR

TOOTING AND MITCHAM UNITED

GROUND: Sandy Lane, Mitcham, Surrey

RECORD ATTENDANCE: 17,500 v QPR (FA Cup) 08/12/1956

When Tooting and Mitcham United left Sandy Lane for their new Imperial Fields ground in Bishopsford Road they abandoned the last large scale venue left in the London area. Sandy Lane was built in 1932 with all the austentation of that era. The huge grandstand, built in 1958, stretched along the majority of the near side of the ground and replaced the original gable roofed wooden stand, itself extended in 1932. The rest of the ground had large sections of terrace. The clubhouse was behind the stand and showed many fading photos of Tooting and Mitcham’s glory years when great cup runs and five figure crowds were not unusual at Sandy Lane. However, with the 2,000 capacity grandstand having wooden bench seating rather than the more politically correct plastic tip-up seats, Sandy Lane was becoming something of an albatross around the club’s neck. It was a terrible shame that this leviathan of a ground had no place in the modern game. If you never visited Sandy Lane, you missed out on an integral part of British football history.

Tooting & Mitcham

Tooting & Mitcham (2)

MOOR GREEN

GROUND: The Moorlands, Sherwood Road, Hall Green, Birmingham

RECORD ATTENDANCE: 5,000 v Romford (FA Amateur Cup) 1951

Few grounds had sacrificed so much to appease a local authority planning committee as The Moorlands. In order to obtain permission to erect floodlights at the ground in 1983, the club had to rotate the pitch through 90 degrees. This meant the classic 1930 wooden main stand and dressing rooms contained within, were left stranded behind one of the re-sited goals at the Delamere Road end. The two extensive open terraces that previously stood behind either goal were demolished. Also the second pitch which was rented to Highgate United was also lost. Even with all the work done, the council only granted permission for pylons that could be winched down and out of sight when not in use. Not only were these considerably more expensive than conventional pylons, but they require a good deal of manual labour to erect before every evening game. Both sides had flat hard standing, but the Petersfield Road end had a shallow terrace laid along the entire dead ball line. This end was eventually covered to give the ground a more enclosed feel. Tragedy struck in 2005 when The Moorlands was devastated by fire in a mindless arson attack. Unable to continue the club merged with Solihull Borough in 2007 forming the current Solihull Moors club.

Moor Green (2)

Moor Green (3)

CHELMSFORD CITY

GROUND: New Writtle Street, Chelmsford, Essex

RECORD ATTENDANCE: 16,807 v Colchester United (Southern League) 10/09/1949

Call me morbid, but I felt I had to go New Writtle Street one more time when it was being demolished in July 1999. I photographed the wreckage, the main stand gutted, broken and twisted floodlight pylons lying like slain goliaths across the pitch. It was indeed a sorry sight. As I snapped away I realised I was not alone, an old man in his seventies was standing on the old uncovered terrace. We spoke at length, he had supported City since 1940, just two years after the professional club was formed, replacing the old amateur Chelmsford FC at New Writtle Street. The Stadium, as it was simply known, had been opened in 1925 and had been developed so well that the club applied for Football League membership on no less than 18 occasions. The old man reckoned the beginning of the end of New Writtle Street came in 1989 when the board took the unwise step of demolishing the pitch length covered terrace, known as The Barn, on the Central Park side of the ground. Its unusual barrelled roof, fairly common if not exactly indiginous to Essex (fine examples are to be found at Southend United and at one time at Southend Manor), marked this out as a classic stand. It was demolished in order for the pitch to be rotated through ninety degrees to allow total redevelopment of the ground to Conference standard. Unfortuately the council turned down City’s planning application, the first of many such run-ins. The ground saw some memorable matches, the noise that could be generated by a full Wolseley End at a big game was something else. By the summer of 1997 the receivers had to be called in and City were booted off the ground six days after the opening League fixture of the 1997/98 campaign. So hasty and unceremonious was the exit that officials had to return to claim equipment and fittings. The club spent the rest of the season at Maldon Town, although the groundshare was to end in acrimony on both sides. The huge site was eventually sold to Countryside Commercial for a meagre £900,000 and now hosts a housing development and the vast Esporta fitness centre. I wonder how much the site is worth now. The club’s meagre recompense dwindled by the week in rent to Billericay Town were dark days for the Clarets. The County Council turned down several planning applications before consenting to the club returning to the city at the Melbourne Athletics Stadium. As the old man and I parted, my wish had been for the councillors and property developers to see his face and the sorrow it showed.

Chelmsford City - NWS

New Writtle Street 1999

WISBECH TOWN

GROUND: Fenland Park, Lerowe Road, Walsoken, Wisbech, Cambridgeshire

RECORD ATTENDANCE: 8,004 v Peterborough United (Midland League) 25/08/1957

Interestingly in his autobiography former England international, Les Ferdinand, described Fenland Park as the most intimidating venue that he ever played at as a footballer. I can understand that sentiment, with its ample covered end terraces and its infamous dark, brooding cowshed, which was originally a farmyard barn. Packed full with hostile marauding Fenmen, I can imagine the young Ferdinand’s reticence. Although it was only opened in 1947, Fenland Park was one of those great venues which appeared to be far older than it actually was. The ground’s original main stand was a timber affair that followed the club from their previous home at Harecroft Road. In the late 1980’s this stand was condemned, demolished and replaced by a brand new seated stand in late 1990. The club boasted such a fine ground with extensive cover that, unusually, no improvements were required when Wisbech gained promotion back to the Southern League in 1997. However, their return to a higher grade was somewhat brief, ending in relegation back to the Eastern Counties League at the end of the 2001/02 campaign. In early 2008 the club had decided to build a new ground and as a condition of sale moved out of Fenland Park in September of that year. They began a two year hiatus at Outwell Swifts ground at The Nest which was augmented with stands and floodlights for the duration. By August 2010 the Fenman had taken occupancy of their new modern home at the Fenland Stadium.

Wisbech old ground

Wisbech old ground (1)

GLOUCESTER CITY

GROUND: Meadow Park, Sudmeadow Road, Hempsted, Gloucester

RECORD ATTENDANCE: 4,000 v Dagenham & Redbridge (FA Trophy) 12/04/1997

Gloucester City have led a nomadic existence since their formation in 1889. The club went to and from various grounds, each with their own problems, until settling at Longlevens in 1935. The ground was out of town and when the club were offered a substantial amount of money by a housing developer in 1960 they began to search for a new ground. Horton Road took four years to acquire and develop but was never built to the originally intended ground scale. This was due to to lack of support and finance and when dog racing, introduced in the 1970’s, was a financial disaster, and coupled with the pitch’s poor drainage, the club sold the ground to builders in 1979. As part of the sale City were provided with a new stadium at Sudmeadow Road although it was not completed until 1986. The club now had an excellent modern but characterful stadium and a vibrant social club. However, the first warning of problems with the ground came in 1990 when the stadium was out of commission for a month when it was flooded by the River Severn. That vast stretch of flowing water returned to haunt the club again in July 2007. Meadow Park was engulfed in a huge amount of flood water, eight foot deep with just the crossbars peeping out above the water line. The club has never been able to return to the stadium groundsharing at Forest Green Rovers, Cirencester Town and currently Cheltenham Town.

Gloucs2

Gloucs

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Misplaced Childhood

Having been watching football around the world for more years than I care to remember and visting huge quantities of clubs and stadiums it occured to me one day what had triggered this, so far, 36 year odyssey. Unearthing a childhood birthday present, “Bartholomew’s Football History Map of England and Wales” I came some way to explaining my compulsion.

Bartholemew map 001

Part of a series which contained titles like the “The Historical Map of England”, “Clan Map of Old Scotland” and wait for it…”The Postal Map of Britain”, John Bartholomew & Sons of Duncan Street, Edinburgh well and truly hooked this youngster with their football map, first published in 1971.

Reverentially opening the folded paper map would reveal a hitherto unparelled cornucopia of information, veitably awash with colour. A map of England and Wales plotted the kits of all the Football League clubs and prominant non-league clubs. Some familiar places and other previously unheard of outposts of this footballing kingdom.

barth 001

There were 159 badges down the left hand side, numbered alphabetically, the double space needed for Brighton and Hove Albion’s conjoined ensignia breaking the twenty lines of eight clubs. Of course the 92 clubs of the Football League, one entiety in those days, and Divisions One to Four, were all present and correct. The remaining 67 spaces were given over to that mysterious group of clubs and grounds collectively known as the “non-league”. Periodic FA Cup headlines aside these clubs seemed to be locked outside the fortress that was the Football League. To a small child their names were enticing “Anstey Nomads”, “Tooting and Mitcham United” and the austere sounding “Hull Brunswick”. Underneath each colour badge the clubs were given their sequential number, their year of formation (god some of these clubs were ancient!) and vitally the name of their home ground! It was surely the catalyst for discovery and spent many years on my childhood bedroom wall, apologies Aldershot for the pin hole.

barth 003

So forty odd years later, I pondered, what had happened to these clubs and the grounds, where were they now? Here is their story.

Looking back there seemed to be no logical order to the selection off the non-league clubs. In those days there was no Conference for the best clubs, the Northern Premier League, the Southern League and the Isthmian League all could have its more successful clubs apply for memebership to the Football League. This would be contested in the annual re-election process where the bottom four teams in the Football League would ask for support from their piers to remain in the League. Very occassionally a successful non-league applicant would gain more votes than a poor performing League club and be admitted to the Football League. The failing League incumbant would be banished to the wilderness of non-league football. In 1971 Cambridge United had just replaced the ailing Bradford Park Avenue in the League. A year later Hereford United would oust Barrow, although in reality successful applications were rare indeed.

Of the 92 Football League clubs at the end of the 1970/71 season, Luton Town, Mansfield Town, Halifax Town, Wrexham, Barrow, Cambridge United, Grimsby Town, Lincoln City, Southport, Stockport County and Workington have lost their Football League status in the intervening years. Aldershot, Chester, Darlington and Newport County have folded though all have reformed subsequently.

Of the League clubs of the 2012/13 season Wigan Atheltic (Premier League), Yeovil Town, Stevenage, Crawley Town (League One), Cheltenham Town, Burton Albion, Wycombe Wanderers, Dagenham and Redbridge and Accrington Stanley (League Two) were excluded from the map despite being in some cases prominent non-league clubs of the era. MK Dons and AFC Wimbledon, of course, had yet to be formed.

The 67 non-league clubs from the map had been drawn, seemingly at random, from no less than 20 Leagues and Divisions of those Leagues. Curious indeed. Added in was a touring team and a nomadic team of no fixed abode.

Of the 159 clubs the following has happened over the last 42 years.

53 have changed grounds from the one listed on the map.

5 clubs have lost their ground since 1971.

2 grounds, Dean Court and Bucks Head have been totally rebuilt on the same site since 1971.

24 clubs have folded of which 16 have reformed. Andover, Hull Brunswick, Edmonton, Letchworth Town, Bridlington Trinity, Northern Nomads, Scarborough and Wolverton Town no longer recognisably exist.

A further three clubs have merged with other clubs, Leytonstone, Ilford and Moor Green.

7 clubs have changed their name from the 1971 version, other than those due to a reformation.

2 clubs that previously groundshared no longer do so.

1

Aldershot Recreation Ground

In 1971 they were in Division Four. The club folded in 1992 and the re-born club, AldershotTown are in League Two having battled back through the non-leagues.

2

Altrincham Moss Lane

In 1971 they were in the Northern Premier League, one step from League football. Nowadays at level 6 – Conference North.

3

Amersham Town Meadow School Lane

In 1971 they were in the Hellenic League Division One. Nowadays at level 10 in the Spartan South Midlands League Division One.

4

Andover London Road

In 1971 they were in the Southern League Division One. Ground demolished 1989, moving to the Portway Stadium. Club folded 2011.

5

Anstey Nomads Cropston Road

In 1971 they were in the East Midland Regional League. Having since played in the Leicestershire Senior League they are now in the East Midlands League.

6

Arsenal Highbury

Still in the top flight, the club moved ground in 2006 to the Emirates Stadium.

7

Aston Villa Villa Park

In 1971 the club were in the Third Division, now in the Premier League.

8

Aveley Mill Field

In 1971 the club were in the Athenian League Premier Division. They are now in the Isthmian League Division One.

9

Barking Vicarage Field

In 1971 they were in the Isthmian League, one step from potential League membership. They are now in the Essex Senior League (level 9). Moved ground in 1973 to MayesbrookPark.

10

Barnet Underhill

In 1971 they were members of the Southern League, they are now a Football League club currently in League Two. Will move grounds for 2013/14.

11

Barnsley Oakwell

Up one tier in 42 years, were Division Three, now in the Championship.

12

Barrow Holker Street

Were in Division Four, lost their League place in 1972. Now in the Conference.

13

Bideford Sports Ground

Were in the Western League in 1971. Now in the Southern League Premier Division (level 7)

14

Birmingham City St.Andrews

No change, were in the second tier in 1971.

15

Bishop Auckland Kingsway

Were in the Northern League Division One as they are now. Ground demolished in 2001, moved to new ground, HeritagePark, in 2010.

16

Bishop’s Stortford Rhodes Avenue

Were in the Isthmian League in 1971, now in the Conference North. Moved ground in 1997 to the Woodside Stadium.

17

Blackburn Rovers Ewood Park

Were in Division Three in 1971, now in the second tier.

18

Blackpool Bloomfield Road

No change, were in the second tier in 1971.

19

Bolton Wanderers Burnden Park

Were in Division Three in 1971, now in the second tier. Moved ground in 1997 to the Reebok Stadium.

20

Bournemouth & Boscombe Athletic Dean Court

Still in the third tier. Ground rebuilt and re-orientated in 2001. Changed name 1972 to AFC Bournemouth.

21

Bradford City Valley Parade

Now in the fourth tier, down a tier from 1971.

22

Bradford Park Avenue Park Avenue

Had just joined the Northern Premier League have been in the Football League. Club folded 1974 and ground demolished in 1973.New club formed 1988 and now in the Conference North. Now playing at the Horsfall Stadium.

23

Brentford Griffin Park

Up one tier from Division Four in 1971.

24

Bridlington Town Queensgate

Were in the Yorkshire League in 1971. Original club folded in 1994. Reformed club now in the Northern Counties East League.

25

Bridlington Trinity Queensgate

Were in the Yorkshire League in 1971. Folded in 1990 when they lost the use of their ground.

26

Brighton & Hove Albion Goldstone Ground

Were in Division 3 in 1971, now second tier. Ground demolished 1997. Moved ground in 2011, having played at Gillingham FC and the Withdean Stadium.

27

Bristol City Ashton Gate

Still in second tier.

28

Bristol Rovers Eastville

Were in Division 3 in 1971, now fourth tier. Ground demolished 1986. Moved ground in 1996 to the Memorial Ground, having shared at Bath City FC.

29

Bromley Hayes Lane

Were in the Isthmian League in 1971, now Conference South

30

Burnley Turf Moor

Still in second tier.

31

Bury Gigg Lane

Were in Division Four in 1971, now in the third tier.

32

Buxton Silverlands

Were in the Cheshire League in 1971, now in the Northern Premier League, Premier Division (level 7)

33

Cambridge United Abbey Stadium

Had just come into the Football League in 1971, now in the Conference.

34

Cardiff City Ninian Park

Still in second tier, moved ground in 2009 to the Cardiff City Stadium.

35

Carlisle United Brunton Park

Were in Division Two in 1971, now in third tier

36

Charlton Athletic The Valley

Still in second tier

37

Chelsea Stamford Bridge

Still in top tier

38

Chester Sealand Road

Were in Division 4, new club now in Conference North. Moved ground in 1992 to the Deva Stadium. ChesterCity folded in 2010, reforming as Chester FC.

39

Chesterfield Recreation Ground

Were in Division 3 in 1971, now fourth tier. Moved ground in 2010 to the ProAct Stadium.

40

Clapton Old Spotted Dog Ground

Were in Isthmian League in 1971, now in Essex Senior League (level 9)

41

Colchester United Layer Road

Were in Division Four in 1971, now in the third tier. Moved ground in 2008 to the Weston Homes Community Stadium.

42

Corinthian-Casuals Sandy Lane

Were in Isthmian League, now in Division 1 of that League (level 8). Were groundsharing at Tooting and Mitcham, have been playing at their own ground, King George’s Field, since 1988.

43

Coventry City Highfield Road

Were in Division One in 1971, now in third tier. Moved ground in 2005 to the Ricoh Arena.

44

Crewe Alexandra Gresty Road

Were in Division Four in 1971, now in the third tier.

45

Crook Town Millfields

Were in Northern League Division 1, now in Division 2 (level 10)

46

Crystal Palace Selhurst Park

Were in Division 1 in 1971, now in second tier

47

Darlington Feethams

Were in Division Four in 1971, new club now in Northern League Division 1. Club folded 2012 re-forming as Darlington 1883. Moved ground 2003-2012 to the Darlington Arena. New club groundsharing at Bishop Auckland.

48

Derby County Baseball Ground

Were in Division 1 in 1971, now in second tier. Moved ground in 1997 to PridePark.

49

Doncaster Rovers Belle Vue

Were in Division 4 in 1971, now third tier. Moved ground in 2006 to the Keepmoat Stadium.

50

Dorchester Town Weymouth Avenue

Were in the Western League in 1971, now in the Conference South. Moved ground in 1990 to Avenue Road.

51

Dover The Crabble

Were in the Southern League Premier Division in 1971, now in Conference South. Folded 1983, reforming as Dover Athletic.

52

Dulwich Hamlet Champion Hill

Were in the Isthmian League in 1971, now in Division 1 of that league (level 8). Original stadium demolished in 1993, smaller stadium built on same site.

53

Eastbourne The Saffrons

Were in the Athenian League Division 1 in 1971, now in the Isthmian League Division 1 (level 8). Changed name 1971 to Eastbourne Town.

54

Edmonton Barrass Stadium

Were in the Athenian League Division 1 in 1971. Merged with Tufnell Park in 1973 to form the club now known as Haringey Borough playing at Coles Park. The Barrass Stadium is still in existence.

55

Everton Goodison Park

Still in top flight.

56

Exeter City St.James Park

Still in fourth tier.

57

Fleetwood Highbury Avenue

Were in Northern Premier League in 1971, now in League Two. Folded 1997, reforming as FleetwoodTown.

58

Frickley Colliery Westfield Lane

Were in the Midland League, now in Northern Premier League Premier Division. Changed name 1971 to Frickley Athletic.

59

Fulham Craven Cottage

Were in Division Two in 1971, now in the top flight.

60

Gillingham Priestfield Stadium

Still in fourth tier.

61

Glossop Surrey Street

Were in Manchester League in 1971, now in North West Counties League Premier Division (level 9). Reverted to original name of Glossop North End in 1992.

62

Grantham London Road

Were in the Midland League, now in Northern Premier League Premier Division. Changed name 1971 to GranthamTown. Moved ground 1991 to the South Kesteven Stadium.

63

Grimsby Town Blundell Park

Were in Division Four in 1971, now in the Conference.

64

Guildford City Josephs Road

Were in the Southern League Premier Division, now in Division One. Folded and ground demolished 1974. New club formed 1996 playing at the Spectrum Leisure Centre.

65

Halifax Town The Shay

Were in Division 3 in 1971, new club now in Conference North. Folded in 2008 reforming as FC Halifax Town.

66

Harlow Town Sports Centre

Were in the Athenian League Division 1 in 1971, now in the Isthmian League Division 1 (level 8). Moved ground in 2006 to Barrows Farm.

67

Harrow Borough Earlsmead

Were in the Athenian League Division 1 in 1971, now in the Isthmian League Premier Division (level 7).

68

Hartlepool Victoria Ground

Were in Division Four, now in third tier. Changed to Hartlepool United in 1977.

69

Harwich & Parkeston Royal Oak Ground

Were in the Athenian League Premier Division, now in the Essex & Suffolk Border League (level 11).

70

Hemel Hempstead Crabtree Lane

Were in the Athenian League Division 1, now in the Southern League Premier Division. Moved ground to Vauxhall Road in 1972 and became Hemel HempsteadTown.

71

Hornchurch Hornchurch Stadium

Were in the Athenian League Premier Division, now in the Conference South. Folded in 2005, reformed as AFC Hornchurch.

72

Huddersfield Town Leeds Road

Were in the First Division in 1971, now in tier two. Moved ground in 1994 to the John Smith’s Stadium.

73

Hull Brunswick Sutton-Ings

Were in the Yorkshire League Division 2 in 1971. Lost ground and folded in 1973.

74

Hul lCity Boothferry Park

Still in the second tier. Moved ground in 2002 to the Kingston Communications Stadium.

75

Ilford Lynn Road

Were in the Isthmian League in 1971. New club in Isthmian League Division One. Old club merged with Leytonstone and demolished ground in 1979.Current club formed in 1987.

76

IpswichTown Portman Road

Were in the First Division in 1971, now in tier two.

77

Leeds United Elland Road

Were in the First Division in 1971, now in tier two.

78

Leicester City Filbert Street

Were in the First Division in 1971, now in tier two. Moved to the King Power Stadium in 2002.

79

Letchworth Town Baldock Road

Were in the Athenian League Division 1 in 1971. Folded 2002. Ground now Herts FA Ground.

80

Leytonstone Granleigh Road

Were in the Isthmian League in 1971. Merged with Ilford 1979 and Walthamstow Avenue 1988. Ground demolished in 1979.

81

Lincoln City Sincil Bank

Were in Division Four in 1971, now in the Conference.

82

Liverpool Anfield

Still in top flight.

83

Loughborough United Browns Lane

Were in the Midland League in 1971. Folded in 1973, ground demolished. New club with same name formed in 1989 playing in the North Leicestershire League.

84

Lowestoft Town Crown Meadow

Were in the Eastern Counties League, now in the Isthmian League Premier Division.

85

Luton Town Kenilworth Road

Were in Division Two in 1971, now in the Conference.

86

Manchester City Maine Road

Still in top flight. Moved ground in 2003 to the Ettihad Stadium.

87

Manchester United Old Trafford

Still in top flight.

88

Mansfield Town Field Mill

Were in Division Three in 1971, now in the Conference.

89

Marine RossettPark

Were in the Cheshire League, now in Northern Premier League Premier Division.

90

Marlow Alfred Davis Ground

Were in the Athenian League Division 1 in 1971. Now in the Hellenic League Premier Division (level 9).

91

Metropolitan Police Imber Court

Were in the Southern League Division 1 in 1971. Now in the Isthmian Premier.

92

Middlesbrough Ayresome Park

Still in second tier. Moved to the Riverside Stadium in 1995.

93

Millwall The Den

Still in second tier. Moved to the New Den in 1993.

94

Moor Green The Moorlands

Were in the Midland Combination in 1971. Ground demolished in 2005, merged with Solihull Borough in 2007.

95

Middlesex Wanderers Touring

Still a touring select eleven.

96

Morecambe Christie Park

Were in the Northern Premier League in 1971, now in League Two. Moved to the Globe Arena in 2010.

97

Nelson Seedhill

Were in the Lancashire Combination in 1971, now in North West Counties League First Division (level 10). Ground demolished in 1980, now playing at Victoria Park.

98

Newcastle United St.James Park

Still in top flight.

99

Newport County Somerton Park

Were in Division Four in 1971, new club now in the Conference. Folded and ground demolished 1989. New club now playing at Rodney Parade.

100

Northampton Town County Ground

Still in fourth tier. Moved ground in 1994 to Sixfields.

101

Northern Nomads Bower Fold

Were in the Lancashire Combination in 1971. Folded 1984, no permanent home they used Stalybridge Celtic’s ground.

102

Northwich Victoria The Drill Field

Were in the Northern Premier League in 1971, now in Division 1 of that league. Drill Field demolished 2002, lost Victoria Stadium in 2012. Now groundsharing at Stafford Rangers FC.

103

Norwich City Carrow Road

Were in Division Two in 1971, now top tier.

104

Notts County Meadow Lane

Still in third tier.

105

Nottingham Forest City Ground

Were in Division One, now in second tier.

106

Oldham Athletic Boundary Park

Still in third tier.

107

Orient Brisbane Road

Were in Division Two in 1971, now in the third tier. Reverted to former name of Leyton Orient in 1987.

108

Oxford United Manor Ground

Were in Division Two in 1971, now in the fourth tier. Moved to the Kassam Stadium in 2001.

109

Peterborough United London Road

We in Division Four in 1971, now in second tier.

110

Plymouth Argyle Home Park

Were in Division Three in 1971, now in the fourth tier.

111

Poole Town The Stadium

Were in the Southern League Premier Division in 1971, now in Division One of that League (Level 8). Lost use of ground in 1994, now playing at the Tatnum Ground.

112

Portsmouth Fratton Park

Were in Division Two in 1971, now in the third tier.

113

Port Vale Vale Park

Were in Division Three in 1971, now in the fourth tier.

114

Preston North End Deepdale

Were in Division Two in 1971, now in the third tier.

115

Prestwich Heys Grimshaws

Were in Lancashire Combination in 1971, now in Manchester League. Ground demolished 1991, now playing at Sandgate Road.

116

Queen’s Park Rangers Loftus Road

Were in Division Two in 1971, now top tier.

117

Reading Elm Park

Were in Division Four in 1971, now top tier. Moved ground in 1998 to the Madjewski Stadium.

118

Redhill Sports Ground

Were in the Athenian League Premier Division in 1971, now in the Sussex County League Division 1 (level 9). Moved ground in 1984 to Kiln Brow.

119

Rochdale Spotland

Were in Division Three in 1971, now in the fourth tier.

120

Rotherham United Millmoor

Were in Division Three in 1971, now in the fourth tier. Lost ground in 2008. Moved ground in 2012 to the New York Stadium.

121

St.Albans City Clarence Park

Were in the Isthmian League in 1971, now in the Southern League Premier Division (level 7).

122

St.Neots Town Shortsands

Were in the Eastern Counties League in 1971, now in the Southern League Premier Division (level 7). Lost ground and folded 1988. Reformed in 1990 moving to RowleyPark in 1993. Club moved to a new ground also called RowleyPark in 2008.

123

Salisbury Victoria Park

Were in the Southern League Division 1 in 1971, now in the Conference South. Moved ground in 1997 to the Raymond McEnhill Stadium. Added City to their name in 1993.

124

Scarborough Athletic Ground

Lost ground and folded in 2007.

125

Scunthorpe United Old Show Ground

Were in Division Four in 1971, now third tier. Moved ground in 1988 to GlanfordPark.

126

Sheffield United Bramall Lane

Were in Division One in 1971, now in third tier.

127

Sheffield Wednesday Hillsborough

Still in second tier.

128

Shrewsbury Town Gay Meadow

Still in third tier. Moved ground in 2007 to the New Meadow.

129

Skelmersdale United White Moss Park

Were in the Northern Premier League in 1971, now in Division One of that League (level 8). Ground demolished 2003 now playing at Stormy Corner.

130

Southall Western Road

Were in the Athenian League Premier Division. Ground demolished 1994. Now in Spartan South Midlands League Division 1 (level 10) groundsharing at Hanwell Town FC.

131

Southampton The Dell

Still in top tier. Moved ground in 2001 to St.Mary’s Stadium.

132

Southend United Roots Hall

Still in fourth tier.

133

Southport Haig Avenue

Were in Division Four, now in the Conference.

134

Stockport County Edgeley Park

Were in Division Four, now in the Conference.

135

Stoke City Victoria Ground

Still in top flight. Moved ground in 1997 to the Britannia Stadium.

136

Sunderland Roker Park

Were in Division Two in 1971, now top flight. Moved to the Stadium of Light in 1997.

137

Sutton United Gander Green Lane

Were in the Isthmian League, now in the Conference South.

138

Swansea City Vetch Field

Were in Division Three now in the top flight. Moved to the Liberty Stadium in 2005.

139

Swindon Town County Ground

Were in Division Two in 1971, now third tier.

140

Telford United Bucks Head

Were in the Southern League Premier Division in 1971. New club now in Conference. Ground totally rebuilt in 2003 now called the New Bucks Head. Old club folded in 2004 reforming as AFC Telford United.

141

Tooting & Mitcham United Sandy Lane

Were in the Isthmian League, now in the First Division of that League. Ground demolished in 2002, now playing at Imperial Fields.

142

Torquay United Plainmoor

Were in Third Division in 1971, now fourth tier.

143

Tottenham Hotspur White Hart Lane

Still in top flight.

144

Tranmere Rovers Prenton Park

Still in third tier.

145

Trowbridge Town Frome Road

Were in the Southern League Division 1. Folded and ground demolished 1998. New club formed and playing at Woodmarsh in the Wiltshire League (level 11).

146

Uxbridge Honeycroft

Were in the Athenian League Division One, now in the Southern League Division 1.

147

Walsall FellowsPark

Still in third tier. Moved ground in 1990 to the Bescot Stadium.

148

Watford Vicarage Road

Still in second tier.

149

Welton Rovers West Clewes

Were in the Western League, now in Division 1 of that League (Level 10).

150

Wembley Vale Farm

Were in the Athenian League Premier Division, now in the Combined Counties League Premier Division (level 9).

151

West Bromwich Albion Hawthorns

Still in top flight.

152

West Ham United Boleyn Ground

Still in top flight.

153

Woking Kingfield

Were in the Isthmian League, now in the Conference.

154

Wolverhampton Wanderers Molineux

Were in Division One in 1971, now in tier two.

155

Wolverton Town The Park

Were in the United Counties League in 1971. Folded 1992. Ground now communal park with stand preserved as it was the oldest surviving structure in football.

156

Workington Borough Park

Were in the Fourth Division, now in the Conference North (level 6).

157

Wrexham Racecourse Ground

Were in Division Three, now in the Conference.

158

York City Bootham Crescent

Were in Division Three, now in fourth tier.

159

Yorkshire Amateur Bracken Edge

Were in the Yorkshire League First Division, now in Division One of the Northern Counties East League.